Foster care

When it comes to fostering, no two children or families are the same. Some children may need foster care for a few nights, while others will need a more permanent home. That is why we need a range of carers for different types of care to meet the needs of our children. Carers can have a positive impact on a child or young person’s life, and can provide the extra support children need in what can be a difficult and confusing time in their lives.

It takes all types of people from all walks of life to care for children. To become an approved carer you will need to participate in an assessment process and complete our pre-service training. Carers need to be patient and show understanding to children in their care. It is important that they are considerate of their own emotions, the emotions of their family and the emotions of children being fostered.

Kinship

Families and communities have always played an important role in raising children and kinship care helps protect these connections in a stable and familiar environment. Sometimes children are unable to live with their parents because the environment is unsafe. Through a family agreement or court order, children can live in kinship arrangements. Kinship carers can include relatives or someone the child already knows. In some cases this can include someone who shares a close cultural or community connection to the child.

Respite

Respite care gives children an opportunity to mix in a different social network while the primary carer takes a short break. It may be regular or occasional time spent with carers who are the child’s primary carer and is usually planned in advance.

Respite carers look after children for short periods of time to give their full-time carers a break. This provides a chance for the foster carers to recharge their energy, respond to other family needs and maintain their general wellbeing. Respite carers look after children in their own home and the length of care is decided before placement. Respite care is most effective if it is planned and regular, however respite care can also be in response to emergency situations.

When it comes to fostering, no two children or families are the same. Some children may need foster care for a few nights, while others will need a more permanent home. That is why we need a range of carers for different types of care to meet the needs of our children. Carers can have a positive impact on a child or young person’s life, and can provide the extra support children need in what can be a difficult and confusing time in their lives.

It takes all types of people from all walks of life to care for children. To become an approved carer you will need to participate in an assessment process and complete our pre-service training. Carers need to be patient and show understanding to children in their care. It is important that they are considerate of their own emotions, the emotions of their family and the emotions of children being fostered.

Families and communities have always played an important role in raising children and kinship care helps protect these connections in a stable and familiar environment. Sometimes children are unable to live with their parents because the environment is unsafe. Through a family agreement or court order, children can live in kinship arrangements. Kinship carers can include relatives or someone the child already knows. In some cases this can include someone who shares a close cultural or community connection to the child.

Respite care gives children an opportunity to mix in a different social network while the primary carer takes a short break. It may be regular or occasional time spent with carers who are the child’s primary carer and is usually planned in advance.

Respite carers look after children for short periods of time to give their full-time carers a break. This provides a chance for the foster carers to recharge their energy, respond to other family needs and maintain their general wellbeing. Respite carers look after children in their own home and the length of care is decided before placement. Respite care is most effective if it is planned and regular, however respite care can also be in response to emergency situations.